Insulin is released from the beta cells in your pancreas in response to rising glucose in your bloodstream. After you eat a meal, any carbohydrates you’ve eaten are broken down into glucose and passed into the bloodstream. The pancreas detects this rise in blood glucose and starts to secrete insulin. The higher the glycemic index of a sweetener, the larger amount of insulin the pancreas must secrete.

Insulin helps fat cells make fat. Consumption of high glycemic ingredients are a major cause of weight gain leading to obesity because of the large amounts of glucose rapidly passed into the bloodstream. Large amounts of insulin are then required to metabolize the glucose.

A lean healthy individual might secrete about 35 units of insulin per day, yet will have about 10 times this amount stored within his pancreas. By contrast, an obese insulin-resistant person might need to produce 100 units daily to maintain normal blood glucose levels.

Most people with type 2 diabetes can secrete insulin, but their bodies don’t process it well. As a result, Type 2 diabetics generally have too much insulin in their blood, which leads to insulin resistance.

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